Issue number 103

1st June
to
1st Sept 2009

Please click a heading or just scroll down to read the articles, click the Up arrow to return here


Front Cover by Micky Thompson

Well, it has been a long winter, and for those hardy enough to brave the weather, photographically speaking, lots of opportunities to take wonderful winter scenes. No doubt some will be on display at the annual Hungerford Camera Club exhibition, in the Town Hall next October. The club always puts on a wonderful show with about 200 large prints on display.

I photographed the cottage garden which is on the front cover in Inkpen last Summer.
A reminder of warmer weather ahead. Now that Chain can be viewed in colour, on the Hungerford web site http://www.hungerford.uk.net/ by clicking community on the left hand side of the home page, the beauty of an English country garden can be viewed in all of
its splendour. Click photo to see it again.

Photo tips about the photograph. To get everything in focus from front to back set the camera to wide angle view and if you can set the aperture to as small as you can this
will help as well. As the lens aperture gets smaller, so the exposure time gets longer, so
a compromise has to be reached keeping the exposure fast enough not to get blurry pictures with camera shake or the breeze moving the flowers around, but small enough
to achieve the depth of focus. To keep the colours rich set the sensitivity on a low setting, but if all of that is too complicated, just remember to use the wide angle setting.
The final tip, remember to take your camera when you go out, it’s not doing any good in
a drawer at home. Good luck and I’ll see you at the autumn Exhibition.

My contact phone number is 01488 686946


.

 

 


Message from the Chairman of CHAIN

I hope you are all enjoying the spring weather and hopefully it hasn’t been too wet.

During the next few months we have lots of events to support in the town. The HADCAF Programme is in this issue and it is packed with events for everyone. Please go along to the Newbury Building Society and get your tickets but PLEASE remember to take back any you don’t need as you would be surprised at how many get taken and never used. If you find you can’t use one at the last minute just contact a committee member or take them along early to the event.

Please support the Primary School Fete on Sunday 8th June as I will be helping on a stall so hope to see you there. It is so important to help the PTA raise funds to provide things for the children which the school budget will not run to.

As I mentioned in the previous issue there is great concern in the town about the number of empty shops around the town and maybe you have an idea how the Town Council can help promote new business within the Town.

As usual I will end with a plea for anyone with a few hours a week to spare who is interested in driving for CHAIN to contact the Chain Office on 683727 or myself on 683302.

Janette Kersey. Chairman


Editor

Hello, doesn’t time fly? Just because being older means that I have less to go I am sure that the minute is only 30 seconds long! However producing this magazine keeps me well occupied and exercises the decreasing brain cells. Some Handybus and Chairman vehicle driving also keeps the body slightly exercised (that’s all I need these days) but the pleasure in doing this CHAIN work is reward in itself. Giving back to Hungerford something that I might well need myself in the future, and so might you.

I’m missing the AGM this year (an oversight, actually on holiday in Portugal) but in my absence you are all invited to go along on Monday 8th June 7.30 pm in the Magistrates Room, Town Hall.

Thank you, I know I keep saying it, but thank you to our advertisers for financing this magazine of ours, and thank you to our article contributors for making it so readable. As I’ve said before I just cut and paste the material that comes my way!

Have you been booked by the latest version of the (green) Traffic Wardens yet? Watch out they are about and booking drivers for offences. Don’t park on double yellow lines, or on the zig zags at pedestrian crossings, or in disabled bays if you’ve not got a blue badge, or the Taxi Rank. If you do they will fine you and it’s not cheap!

So we go to the printers before the Town Bridge presentation takes place. I wonder how it will go, will the design be great, or will it obliterate our bridge of character? Will they be coming back if Hungerford people object to their plans? We shall see!

Goodbye Jo!   Jo wrote the recipes that have been in CHAIN MAIL for the last two years, but she has nominated a friend to take over the spot, so welcome Angela.

Just a little selection from what’s to see.

Blasts from the Past. Did you think it was cold this winter?

Bus Pass 1,2,3&4 Some essential bus journeys using your FREE West Berks Bus Pass.

Depression. A very serious illness that can be so well hidden.

Small Articles. Chris appeals….and …. Yet another Film Club, now at Kintbury, as well as Hungerford and East Garston

The Mayor, goodbye Peter, hello Elizabeth, The Mayors Report.

Please tell your friends that have moved away that CHAIN MAIL can be read so much easier now (new format / layout) on Hungerford’s Web page, just click on Community and it will take you there.

Volunteering for CHAIN? Lots of information and FAQ’s now on Hungerford’s website, CLICK THE LINK IN THE TOP LEFT HAND CORNER PLEASE.

Articles for publication should be sent to me by the 7th of the month proceeding publication, i.e.7th August for the Autumn issue on September 1st.
If you send something to me I will always acknowledge within 3 days. No reply from me then I have not got it, so please re-send.


Thanks & Regards David Piper.
Tel: 01488-683152           davidhpiper111@btinternet.com


Hungerford Mayor

Since the last Chain letter, I have received congratulations from people all over the town, although I had to point out, these were a little premature, because the position of Mayor
is an elected one and this had not yet occurred.

I have to say they have now been very gratefully received as I was elected as Mayor on the evening of 5th May by my fellow Councillors. I have accepted the office with great pride and look forward to representing the town over the coming year. For me it is an honour and a privilege to do so.

I have been a Councillor since 2003 and lived in Hungerford since 1991 but my family has connections going back 50 years. I am delighted that my Deputy for the year is Councillor Jenny Booth who has been Chairman of Planning over the last year.

I would like to pay tribute to my predecessor, Councillor Peter Harries who was a very hard working and generous Mayor. He continued to build on the strength and public perception of our current Town Council and will be a hard act to follow.

We would welcome applications for Hungerford in Bloom which will take place on
4th July and application form can be obtained by contacting Councillor Margaret Wilson on 01488 683758.

We are obviously still working hard to supply allotments for the Towns people and have signed our side of the lease for the Marsh Lane site. We are still waiting for the land owner to sign too and then 87 allotmenters will be able to begin planting.

Other ventures include placing three Sarsen stones at St Saviours Cemetery and the commemoration with a plaque to mark out the pauper’s graves from the old workhouse of Hungerford. The stones have been obtained from Upper Lambourn and are being purchased by a donation to riding for the disabled.

I also wish to address the headstone of James Dean- the coachman buried in St Lawrence’s Churchyard. The stone is now quite weathered and the inscription is
starting to be lost. We have approached St Lawrence PCC and are looking into either
re engraving the stone or again placing a plaque with the inscription at the side.

Elizabeth Cardwell

Mayor of Hungerford


Our Recipe page by Angela.

Finally the season we’ve been all waiting for is here, and with it lots of fun activities that we can do. Foraging is one of them; this means going out for a walk and coming back with lots of seasonal free food from Mother Nature. That’s why for this edition we have carefully chosen two mouth watering recipes which you can not only cook but will also have the pleasure of gathering the ingredients.

Next time you walk through the Marsh or Common keep an eye open for nettles. Collect the tops of young nettles (ones that are just growing or have been cut and are growing again, if you collect them when they’re older and very tall they’ll be stringy). Also collect some elderflowers, as few as 4 will suffice for bubbly elderflower champagne.

If foraging is not your cup of tea, just pop in the next farmer’s market ( 3rd Sunday of the month) and pick some seasonal stuff to suit your palate.

Nettle & Wild Garlic Ciabatta
500g strong white flour, 3 tablespoons virgin olive oil, 1 tsp salt, 300ml warm water, 25g fresh yeast or 1 tsp quick yeast, 1 tsp sugar, pinch Vitamin C powder
2 cups nettle tops / leaves
a handful wild garlic leaves (or 1 clove garlic crushed)
Wash and chop nettles and garlic, sweat in 1 of the 3 tablespoons olive oil then leave to cool.

Dissolve sugar, vitamin C and yeast in half the warm water.
Put flour in a large bowl and mix in yeast liquid.
Dissolve salt in remaining warm water and add this.
Add the olive oil, nettles and garlic and mix well.
Cover the bowl with a plate and leave to rise for 3 hours.
Gently scrape the dough out onto a large greased baking tray.
Dust lightly with flour and leave to rise for 30 minutes.
Bake in an oven pre-heated to 220°C, 425°F, Mark 7 for 30 minutes.

Elderflower Champagne – makes 4.5 litres / 8 pints
675 grams (1½lbs) caster sugar, 4.5 litres (1 gallon) water,
2 tablespoon white wine vinegar, 1 large lemon finely shredded rind and juice,
4 large elderflower heads, flowers snipped from stems

Pour caster sugar in large bowl, add water & stir till sugar dissolved. Stir in vinegar, lemon juice and rind. Stir in elderflowers, cover and leave for 48 hours. Strain through scalded muslin, pour into clean bottles & screw on tops. Leave to stand for 3 weeks or more. The champagne becomes very effervescent, chill well before serving.

For more seasonal recipes or info visit our website HEAT food group (Hungerford, environmental, action team), HEAT regards itself as a resource for the community and also an instrument via which ideas and initiatives to reduce the impact of the Hungerford area on climate change can be channelled and implemented.                            AMQ


Letters & e-mails

Dear Editor,
As I am a member of the London NAS/UWT Retired Members Association (and am actually on the committee) I thought the enclosed article (printed below)
from the Manchester Newsletter may be of use to you for ‘CHAIN MAIL’.
I have to admit that I have also used articles from CHAIN MAIL for our Newsletter but have always acknowledged the source, of course. Many of our members are most impressed by CHAIN and what it offers!! So congratulations to you all!
May I also add that I thoroughly enjoy reading CHAIN MAIL. Thank you all for the hard work you put into it’s production. Yours Sincerely S.D.

Ed’s comment, Thank you for the thanks, tis not me that makes it a success but all the letter writers and article contributors. I just cut and paste!      So to S.D.’s article

P.S. I don’t think this would be accepted by teachers today

Rules for Female Teachers…Aberdeen 1915

You will not marry during your term of contract
You are not to keep company with men.
You must be home between the hours of 8pm. And 6am. Unless attending a
school function.
You may not loiter downtown in ice-cream stores.
You may not travel beyond the city limits without permission.
You may not travel in a carriage, or automobile with any man unless he is your
Father or brother.
You may not smoke cigarettes, nor dress in bright colours.
You may UNDER NO CIRCUMSATANCES dye your hair.
You must wear at least two petticoats.
Your dress must not be any shorter than two inches above the ankle.
To keep the school clean you must
Sweep the school room once daily
Scrub the floor with hot, soapy water at least once a week
Clean the blackboard once a day
Start the fire at 7am. So that the room will be warm by 8am.


Regards S.D.   

Hello Ed,
A tip for your readers. “Don’t pour oil or fat down the sink, it clogs the pipes. Instead, get a container similar to a 4L ice-cream carton and half fill it with cat litter. Then pour waste oil into it, preferably while it’s still warm (but not hot), and once it’s soaked in, bag it and bin it! Depending on your usage, this could be daily or weekly.”
Regards B.B.


Dear Editor,

We are celebrating ten years! The PROBUS Club of Hungerford celebrates it’s first decade this May. Started by Hungerford Rotary Club in 1999 , the Club grew rapidly and by the time of the first Annual general meeting had increased membership to over forty. Today the membership is over sixty and the Club meets monthly for lunch followed by a speaker on the last Thursday of every month at Hungerford Royal British Legion Club. They also enjoy occasional social events. Membership is open to all retired Professional and Business men and women. In Hungerford or surrounding villages and more information is available from the membership secretary, Pat Smalley. Tel 01488 684127.


Dear Ed,
Could you pop this into the next CHAIN MAIL please?
Hope and Homes for Children

The local Support Group for Hope and Homes for Children held another successful
event on 1st May; an informal supper evening at Hungerford Royal British Legion Hall. Frank Quinn, Chairman of the local Group, reported on the charity’s recognition by UNICEF and the World Health Organisation as ’best practice’ working to close Institutions and Orphanages in the poorer nations of the world and placing the children
in family units.
The Group’s next event is:- A Grand Concert by Berkshire Maestros (The Young Musicians Trust) at Douai Abbey, Woolhampton.
‘Children Celebrate the Child’ 7.30pm Saturday 6th June.
This is an opportunity to hear some excellent playing and singing by young people in the excellent surroundings of the architectural award winning Abbey.
Tickets (£10) are available from Crown Needlework, Hungerford, Newbury Corn Exchange or from 01488 683538. (Possible coach from Hungerford}.               RTR


Dear David Piper,
HELP! My old electric typewriter has gone mad – refuses to print what I say.
Example below. Is there anyone out there who might be able to bring it to it’s senses?
It’s greatly missed – I like to keep in touch with scattered friends and family, not knowing anything about computers etc. I could manage an old manual typewriter – if only I hadn’t got rid of mine and if it is still possible to get ribbons etc. I don’t expect CHAIN MAIL readers will know what THAT IS !!
I live in hope – CHAIN can manage anything!

Yours sincerely JB 01488 683296


Ed’s Comment :- I do hope someone can help, JB’s handwriting was a bit difficult to decipher!


Bits 1

On this page………….Special Parking….Kintbury Cinema….Flowers & Poems….Hungerford Archers….
Town Band dates….Fetes & Carnival

Special Parking

On Market Days (Wednesdays) during the period 10 June – 22 July 2009 (a total of 7 Wednesdays).

Parking is free in Church Street and Station Road Car Parks after 10am

– the late start will ensure that the benefit goes to shoppers–

The dispensation does not extend to on-street parking.
Similar shoppers’ schemes in Newbury, Pangbourne and Thatcham.     PH & DH

Kintbury Cinema, holds showings about once a month at the village hall in Kintbury.

The hall, which has ample car parking space, is near the centre of the village at: 18 Inkpen Road Kintbury RG17 9TX Our showings are usually on a Saturday evening at
7.30 p.m., with a bar beforehand, open from 6.45 p.m. Tickets are £4 each and are available at the door or, in advance, from Bastables, The Butcher, in Church Street Kintbury (open Tuesday to Saturday) Our next showing is Saturday June 6 – Slumdog Millionaire(15) Future dates are, July 11, Sept 5, Sept 26 – this will be a “Bollywood Night” with a curry supper during the interval ! Oct 10, Nov 14,Dec 5.
If you would like any further information, please do contact me. Michael Kaye Chairman, Kintbury Coronation Village Hall                                m.makaye@btinternet.com

Flowers and Poetry HADCAF FLOWER FESTIVAL at St. Lawrence Church over the weekend of 18th/19th July. I have written to 27 local organisations, inviting them to provide a flower arrangement. If any organisation or individual is interested but has not been invited, please accept my apology and give me your name to be added to the list. The theme is Flowers and Poetry, and all exhibitors are asked to submit a poem as well as an arrangement. The church will be open from 9am to 8pm on Friday 17th July for setting up, and also open at the same time on Monday 20th for collection. . I would be eternally grateful for offers of help (and scones!! For the teas) . Chris Buck, tel Hungerford 683396


HUNGERFORD ARCHERS     (formerly Hungerford Longbow Club) was founded in 1995 by two local residents, Bob Maslin and Peter Bray. We cater to all ages (from 7 yrs upwards) and abilities and have full disabled access. We shoot from 10am till noon (aprox) on Sundays all year. All equipment will be provided and an experienced club member will instruct you. Call Rob Bainbridge on 01488 683711 for more information
or to arrange a session with us. We look forward to seeing you!


Fete Dates and the Hungerford Carnival
June 6th 2pm Chilton Foliat Fete
7th 1.30pm Hungerford Primary School Fete
13th 2pm St Lawrence Church Fete
July 18th Hungerford CarnivalHungerford Town Band

Sunday 14th June Victoria Park Bandstand, Newbury at 3pm


Sunday 28th June Eastrop Park, Basingstoke at 3pm


Sunday 5th July Victoria Park Newbury Bandstand at 3pm

Sunday 26th July HADCAF Finale Festival Concert,
Hungerford Corn Exchange at 7pm

Sunday 16th August John Coles Park, ChippenhamBandstand at 3pm

 

Depression is a serious illness.

Health professionals use the terms depression, depressive illness or clinical depression to refer to something very different from the common experience of feeling miserable or fed-up for a short period of time. When you’re depressed, you may have feelings of extreme sadness that can last for a long time. These feelings are severe enough to interfere with your daily life, and can last for weeks or months, rather than days.

Depression is quite a common condition, and about 15% of people will have a bout of severe depression at some point in their lives. However, the exact number of people with depression is hard to estimate because many people do not get help, or are not formally diagnosed with the condition.
Women are twice as likely to suffer from depression as men, although men are far more likely to commit suicide. This may be because men are more reluctant to seek help for depression.

Depression can affect people of any age, including children. Studies have shown that 2% of teenagers in the UK are affected by depression.
People with a family history of depression are more likely to experience depression themselves. Depression affects people in many different ways and can cause a wide variety of physical, psychological (mental) and social symptoms.
A few people still think that depression is not a real illness and that it is a form of weakness or admission of failure. This is simply not true. Depression is a real illness with real effects, and it is certainly not a sign of failure. In fact, famous leaders, such as Winston Churchill, Abraham Lincoln and Mahatma Gandhi, all experienced bouts of depression.
Have you..
found little pleasure or interest in doing things?
found yourself feeling down, depressed or hopeless?
had trouble falling or staying asleep, or sleeping too much?
been feeling tired or had little energy?
had a poor appetite or been overeating?
felt that you’re a failure or let yourself or your family down?
had trouble concentrating on things like reading the paper or watching TV?
been moving or speaking slowly, or very fidgety, so that other people could notice?

Your score points         1. No, not at all……………….…….2. On some days…
                                       3. On more than half the days…   ..4. Nearly every day

If you answered with numbers 1 or 2 then it’s unlikely that you are suffering, but if in doubt contact NHS Direct or your GP

If you answered some or all with 3 or 4 then do contact NHS Direct or your GP

If you have any concerns about your health or your mood please call 0845 4647 or arrange to see your GP


The Old Codger

The above heading was written in Century Gothic, which as the Editor said two years ago, ‘summed me up’’, but I am now to be reproduced in ‘Arial’ font, which is clearer for the Internet pages and as I waffle so much actually gives me more words on this page!

I wrote this on the 11th March. Labour quote! ‘’Savers with £10,000.00 last year could expect to earn £550 a year before tax’’ Even this says they are in cloud cuckoo land. Now you would be lucky to get £10 (that’s true). Still this government reckons we would get 10.4% (set in 1987) about £1040.00. In reality we are just about getting 1/1000th of that now! This figure is NOT under review! A spokesperson for DWP (the OAP pension payers) say’s that us oldies with savings of more than £6000.00, should contribute some of their weekly expenses so that the Government can help those on the lowest of incomes.

Just WHAT does this Government think we are? If not the lowest of the LOW! So if any of you who are still paying 20% tax on your savings, and your total income is less than £9490.00 get an R85 form from banks or Building societies and get it sent off. Anybody under 65 sit up and take note of what you won’t get when you retire, and remember that you will pay the same amount of tax on your savings, as you pay Income tax on your wages.

I return to the Government figure of interest. This is their underhanded means of denying an OAP top up benefits (hardship benefits) as they take this inflated rate of theirs into account. Just what would they do to us if we LIED on the same scale as them? In the budget the man in Cloud Cuckoo Land still insists that we OAPs get 10% on our savings (no disrespect intended to Cuckoos).

Goodbye Robert (doom & gloom) Peston, and hello Vince. He does seem so sensible & believable!

I got my friend to e-mail Streetcare the other day about the very faded mini-roundabouts in the High Street and by The Bear, as I thought that they could be an accident waiting to happen! Had a reply back from the West Berks Senior Technician in Traffic & Road Safety, and I quote ‘’I have added the roundabouts for consideration in the financial year starting next month.’’ Just consideration mind you, isn’t there some legal duty to maintain them to a safe visible standard?

Newspaper Headline (9.3.2009) ‘Town Hall threat to seize empty homes’ EDMO.
How about compulsory purchase for that derelict building in Bridge Street and turn it into 2 low cost flats for our youngsters?

How are the 20mph speed limits by our two Schools progressing. Are they still being ‘considered’ as well? Well yes actually by WBC! And now the Government!

After nearly seven months the gas guns have finally stopped. What law allows these crop growers to so dominate local peace and quiet?

Please contact me through David’s e-mail,            davidhpiper111@btinternet.com
Or to CHAIN Office, Unit 9, 19 High Street, Hungerford, RG17 0NL, and title your words/thoughts as…….Old Codger column please ……. Bye Bye & keep safe.


Gardening by Stacy

THE CONTENTED GARDENER
 

Happy Birthday to Kew
This year, The Royal Botanic gardens at Kew celebrates its 250th anniversary. The eminent gardens were named as a World Heritage Site by Unesco in 2003 and they continue to thrive and develop, reacting to the challenges our world faces.
The BBC programme “A Year at Kew” has given a very informative insight into the valuable work which Kew carries out, caring for the Living Collections, The Herbarium collection and the Millennium Seed bank at Wakehurst place, in line with their aims to “ inspire and deliver science-based plant conservation worldwide, enhancing the quality of life”.
It would be easy to view Kew as a dusty relic, a repository for relics and ancient scientists, but it successfully combines history and tradition with cutting edge technology. Most importantly it is very accessible for ordinary people, including families with children.

 

The Treetop walk allows you to view the trees from 18 metres above the ground to give a completely new experience. The hand held Kew Ranger device uses GPS to allow visitors to get the most from their visit, picking out attractions and even showing how to avoid crowds!.

 

There are a number of special activities and exhibitions running this year to celebrate the 250th celebrations. Inspired by Darwin, the Plant Spy Thinking walk is specifically aimed at families and teaches about the different parts of plants. I particularly like the sound of Climbers and Creepers, a play area cum interactive learning experience where children are “eaten” by a pitcher plant or climb into a plant mimicking a pollinator. To extend the learning experience of this area, there is a Climbers and Creepers website, aimed at children age 3 to 6 where children learn about the interaction of plants and animals while playing fun games.

For the more mature visitors there is a Seed Walk- giant sculptures of seeds which highlight the work of the Millennium Seed Bank- and there are living workshops where visitors can participate in creating sculptures.
So if you have never made a visit to Kew, this is definitely the year to pay a visit and support this amazing resource.

Stacy Tuttle


Nature Notes by Hawkeye

Barn Owls

An appeal for funds on behalf of the Barn Owl Conservation Network

Barn Owls were once a common sight in the Hungerford area but now they are rarely seen.
The main reasons for their demise are the loss of habitat and the loss of roosting or nesting sites.
So many old barns have been converted to houses or pulled down to be replaced by industrial units. And of course the old fashioned farming methods have had to give way to produce more food for the increasing population.
Many farmers have graciously given the Barn Owl Group permission to put up Barn Owl Boxes on their land. The boxes replace the barns to a great degree. They have also given Jason Ball, a Barn Owl Conservation Network Advisor for Berkshire, permission to survey their land and find the most suitable site for boxes.
Unfortunately boxes cost over £80 each and funds are drying up. So I wondered if there were any nature lovers who would like to help support the Network. Its objective is to bring the Barn Owl back to its former high numbers and ensure its presence in the Hungerford area.
There used to be 138 owl species throughout the world but now 4 species have become extinct.
I once read a book which described owls as “cats on wings” and I think this sums them up most accurately. They are creatures which are superbly adapted to hunt rodents and like cats they can be quite noisy at night time. Although the hoots and screams are raucous courting sounds and it is the Tawny Owl which hoots. Tawny Owls are woodland birds and are not so badly affected as Barn Owls, often called the White Owl or Screech Owl.    Owls are birds of prey which hunt at night mainly but the Barn Owl is both nocturnal and diurnal. The Barn Owl can be seen in daylight in winter when food is scarce and in summer when more food must be found for young.
Interestingly the Barn Owl shares exactly the same diet as the Kestrel. But the Kestrel is not in danger as it has miles of motorways to hover over.
Conservationists throughout Europe are worried about the decline of the Barn Owl and everyone agrees that the provision of nesting boxes in suitable open land would be beneficial.
The Barn Owl is found on every continent except Antarctica. However, it is on the list of vulnerable birds in the U.K. – the B.T.O. (British Trust for Ornithology) and R.S.P.B.’s Amber List.
So if you want to make a donation please contact Jason Ball on 0771 92 25965 or write to him c/o The Sheepdrove Trust, Sheepdrove Organic Farm, Lambourn, Berks., RG17 7UU . He would like cheques made out to the Sheepdrove Trust which is a registered charity. The Trust supports the owl network and manages donations on their behalf for tax relief purposes.

Hawkeye


Using an idea of mine, and with the bus times provided by Paul Frances (Public Transport Representative for Hungerford Town Council), we hope that you will find the following useful.
   Any queries about local public transport may be referred to him on 01488 685238.There are also bus time tables available from the Town Council’s Office and the Library. If you have to attend hospital for an appointment please ask them to make the appointment late enough so that you are able to make use of your Free Bus Pass….buses only after 9am.

W/F = Wednesday & Fridays only…………Th = Thursdays only………Not Th = Not Thursdays
Ring the bell to alight…Hail to board (except outside Rayners or Town Hall)

H1 = Town service, get the special H1 leaflet from the Library or Council offices

Then for your leisure three villages to visit shown on the last page.


EARLIEST APPOINTMENT USING YOUR FREE WEST BERKS BUS PASS
AT GREAT WESTERN Hospital SWINDON = 11.30

Bus noHungerford
Gt Western
Swindon
 
Swindon
Gt Western
HungerfordBus no
   Bus Sta.
 
Bus Sta.   
46
10.36
11.18
11.30
 
 
 
 
 
46
12.36
13.18
13.30
 
13.35
13.47
14.32
46
46
15.22
16.06
16.18
 
15.35
15.47
16.34
46
46
16.43
17.24
17.36
 
17.45
17.57
18.49
46

Hungerford to Swindon Great Western Hospital.
Catch bus No.46 at Hungerford outside Rayners
At the hospital it drops you off outside the Hospital building
To catch the bus to Hungerford go back to the same bus stop.


EARLIEST APPOINTMENT USING YOUR FREE WEST BERKS BUS PASS AT SAVERNAKE Hospital = 10.30

Bus noHungerfordSavernakeMarlborough MarlboroughSavernakeHungerford
Bus no
20A
9.58
10.26
10.32
 
12.15
12.19
12.48
20A
20A
11.25
11.54
12.00
 
14.14
14.18
14.47
20A
20A
13.25
13.54
14.00
 
15.35
A4#15.47
16.17
20
20
15.10
15.48
15.55
 
16.20
16.24
16.56
20
 
 
 
 
 
17.00
A4#17.04
17.31
20A
     
A4# = BUS STOP ON A4 ROAD

Hungerford to Savernake Hospital
Catch bus nos. 20 & 20A at Hungerford outside Rayners.
At the hospital it drops you off in the Hospital grounds.
A4# buses to come back (15.47 & 17.04), carefully cross the A4 road to the bus stop.

Bus passes can also be used at the weekends, times may vary slightly.
Please contact Paul for further help


EARLIEST APPOINTMENT USING YOUR FREE WEST BERKS BUS PASS
WEST BERKSHIRE Hospital Newbury = 10.45

Hungerford to West Berks Hospital
Catch the number 13 bus outside Marc Allen the Estate Agents.
Catch the number 222 & 95 buses at Hungerford Town Hall, Thursdays only.

Bus no
Hungerford
Wyevale
Newbury
 
Newbury
Wyevale
Hungerford
Bus no
13
9.20
 
10.08
 
10.30
 
11.18
13
222 Th
9.40
A4# 9.43
10.10
 
12.30
 
13.18
13
95 Th
11.00
A4# 11.03
11.20
 
12.30
12.47
12.50
222 Th
 
 
 
 
 
13.40
A4# 13.57
14.00
95 Th
H1 W&F
11.05
A4# 11.10
 
 
A4# = ON A4 PUT YOUR HAND UP
13
11.20
 
12.08
 
 
11.40
11.43
H1 W&F
13
13.20
 
14.08
 
15.30
 
16.28
13
13
16.30
 
17.18
 
17.30
 
18.18
13

Bus nos. 13 & 222 at Newbury, get off at the Bus Station, to get the numbers 2 or 11 bus for the Hospital, these two buses actually go all the way into the Hospital grounds.
Bus 95 get off at Camps, if you are going on to the West Berks hospital cross the road to Superdrug. When returning to Hungerford you also catch the 95 at Superdrug,

The 222 on a Thursday can also be caught at Newbury Bus Station, Iceland, Superdrug or the Clock Tower.

Bus no
Newbury
West Berks Hosp
 
West Berks Hosp
Newbury
Bus no
11
10.18
Runs
10.34
 
10.50
Runs
11.05
11
11
10.33
every
10.49
 
11.05
every
11.20
11
11
10.48
15 mins
11.04
 
11.20
15 mins
11.35
11
11
11.03
until
11.19
 
11.35
until
11.50
11
 
 
17.33
 
 
 
18.05
 
 
2
11.05
 
11.16
 
11.47
 
12.00
2
Runs every hour until 17.05
 
 
Runs every hour until 16.47
 

West Berks Hospital to Newbury catch the bus numbers 2 or 11 and get off at Newbury Bus Station to catch bus number13 or 22.
If it’s a Thursday and you are catching the 95 for Hungerford get off at Camps and cross the road to Superdrug.

Bus passes can also be used at the weekends, times may vary slightly.
Please contact Paul for further help.

 


Health by Liz

Slimmer by Summer ?

Many of us would love to shed a few pounds for the summer months ahead. Liz Chandler from Natures Corner, looks at some natural remedies that offer a much needed kick-start to a weight loss programme.
Don’t be fooled by miracle diets and ‘get slim quick’ adverts. The only diet that really works is one that includes a workable food plan, exercise and motivation. A workable food plan simply means a modified diet that will work for you and will become as natural to you as breathing. So let’s look at a few ‘it worked for me’ stories:–
29 year old Emma Limpus had put on a lot of weight during a world trip and weighed in at 15 and a half stone. She started on a strict diet and exercise programme but the weight was very slow to shift. She was recommended a HCA supplement from her local health store and within 5 weeks she had lost 2 stones in weight. Emma says ‘I’m thrilled with the results and all the amazing comments from my friends and family’.
Made from a yellowish fruit native to India, Hydroxycitric Acid (HCA) helps to block the absorption of carbohydrates into stored fat, helping to induce weight loss. It also acts as an appetite suppressant. It comes in the form of a capsule that is swallowed with water.

Sam Wood aged 35, felt she had a sluggish lymph system and the remedy that proved successful for her was Organic Cleavers Tincture. ‘Within 8 weeks I had lost a stone’ she says. ‘I wasn’t actually doing anything different, same healthy diet, same exercise routine; I just continued to take the Cleavers tincture 2 or 3 times a day. My Cleavers bottle has become a permanent fixture in my kitchen cupboard and I would definitely recommend it to anyone finding it hard to lose weight, if only to kick-start your system’.
Cleavers is considered to be one of the best lymphatic tonics available. The lymphatic system is a complex network of fluid filled nodes, vessels, ducts and glands that bathe our cells and carry our body’s waste material away from the tissues to neutralize it. It handles toxins that enter the body through external sources, such as foods or air pollution, as well as internally produced toxins. A sure sign of an overburdened lymphatic system is glandular pain, fatty deposits and cellulite.
Here are a few more natural remedies that can assist weight loss:
Chromium helps with blood sugar regulation and reduces sugar cravings
Essential Fatty Acids (Omega 3 & 6) are anti-lipogenic, which means they block fat storage and increase fat burning
Green Tea boosts heat burning metabolism
L’Carnitine is very important for fat metabolism, especially in heart and muscle cells. It moves fat that sits outside the cells into the cell’s mitochondria for burning for exercise.
Let your local health store advise you on a sensible eating regime, which combined with an increase in gentle exercise and one of the many natural remedies on offer, will empower you to be slimmer by summer.

by Liz Chandler, of Natures Corner, Newbury

info@naturescorner.co.uk

Our Community

On this page……..

Hungerford Catholic Church….Savernake Hospital…..Boyan Choir

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church

After many months of discussions with our architect followed by meetings with, local council officials, planning officers and members of the highways department we are now ready to submit the plans to develop the site in Priory Road which for more than sixty years has been the home of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church. We hope to obtain permission to build a new church and a small development of houses on the land.

We feel that the plan which we have arrived at is in keeping with the local area and with Hungerford itself and hope very much that when the plans are seen people will share our enthusiasm for this long awaited and much needed new church.

We have a congregation of between 100 and 120 who attend Mass each Sunday most of whom feel a connection with and a love of our little church but we do feel that now is the time to provide a more permanent structure for the future of our community. M.A.

SAVERNAKE HOSPITAL…………..The latest from Val

For those of you following the long and winding path that leads to a Judicial Review (JR) of the decisions taken by Wiltshire Primary Care Trust, there has been quite a bit to read lately! News has travelled beyond our local media to the national press. Coverage of this complicated story is more enthusiastic than it is factually correct on occasions and I keep hastening to add, that Savernake Hospital is still open!

It is the Minor Injuries Unit (MIU) and Day Hospital closures that we are concerned with. The MIU is, of course, the most well known out of the two departments. There are few people who have not heard of, or indeed attended for kind and efficient treatment from its’ nurses following an injury. It is very sorely missed – no pun intended!

To follow the happenings, or perhaps attend the JR in the Royal Courts of Justice in London, you need to access www.friendsofsavernake.org and click on News or CASH. The Friends of Savernake Hospital organized a coach to take 20 supporters to the Strike Out Hearing (which we won) in April. I believe they will be doing the same for the duration of the JR, which will be on June 30th, July 1st, 2nd & 3rd when it will, at last, be time for a Judge to decide.

Val Compton


Return of the Boyan Choir of Ukraine to Hungerford
November 3rd 2009

Volunteer Host Families Sought

“There was a purity of sound and dynamic control that was at times almost unbelievable… From a breathy murmur to a full robust sound from the entire ensemble at full throttle, this was a sound of choral singing to remember long after the last notes had faded.” Newbury Weekly News, Nov13th 2008)

We are delighted to confirm that the Boyan Ensemble of Kiev will be returning to Hungerford as part of their 2009 tour, following the standing ovation they received from the audience at St Lawrence’s Church at the end of last year’s magnificent and inspiring performance.

The choir, whose members are drawn from Kiev’s professional male choir, will bring the beauty of Eastern Orthodox Chants and the songs of Ukraine’s rich folk heritage back to St Lawrence’s Church on Tuesday November 3rd 2009.
This year, we would again like to ask local people to accommodate two or more members of the Choir for the night of the concert. All but two of the thirty members of the Choir tour party are male.

If you are interested & would like more information, please contact:
Alison Mawdsley or Gordon Crowe on 01635 821525
Email:     alisonmawdsley@yahoo.co.uk

Living memory

Fairs ,Sweets and Changes.
The morning is cold, and I am looking forward to my breakfast, in the company of others on the veranda of the Town Hall. It is Victorian Extravaganza Day, and the street is being marked out for the incoming fair ground rides. Now it does not take much to shake up my memory cells of the “Mop” fairs of my boyhood; at this point one of the company said “I tried to make some toffee apples for today ,but did not have much success”. Whereupon I replied that I had not had such a thing since the days of the October Fairs that filled the High Street from top to bottom, with booths, rides hoopla’s and stalls; and of course patrons from a wide rural area. (One fair was on the Wednesday before the 11th. October and one on the following Wednesday. Mr. Robert Edwards, the showman from Swindon was born in a living van parked underneath the railway bridge on October 15th.1879 so it was his birthday pitch)

A little while later at the first Morley Lunch of the year, conversing with an old (she will forgive me) Hungerfordian, sticky toffee pudding was mentioned, ‘Oh’ says I  ” don’t you like toffee”?   “I used to love the toffee apples you could get at the old street fairs, and see them being made”.was her reply. Now, I well remember that sweet stall, it was Johnny and Hilda Bunce’s and they came for a number of years. Mrs. Bunce was so expert at boiling and manipulating the sugar for her humbugs, barley sugars, toffee apples etc. She was immaculately clean, and proud of her hygiene record. “Every time I sets up the ‘Elf man’s ‘ere”. She would pull the soft sugar as it was cooling, adding the flavours and colours, then she would throw it onto a big hook at the side of the stall and pull and stretch it into a long striped rope the diameter of the sweet she was making, twisting the barley sugars, cutting to length with a large pair of shiny shears, or she would deftly turn the rope ninety degrees at each inch humbug, and dropping them into a bowl, ready to sell in cones of paper.

The Mop fairs eventually did not find favour with the traffic authorities, coupled with the Carnival being held in September, and showmen attending this did not want to retrace part of the season’s circuit. Now today I cannot remember , that is, if I ever knew, the source of heat that was used for sugar boiling in Mrs. Bunces stall, but it was a good dark clear toffee on the sharp apples, and humbugs that kept you quiet for a while, but demise was inevitable.
I think that John Bunce was the last to attend on a fair day, he brought a striker( try your strength, and ring the bell) and a little sweet stall in an effort to secure the ground for the future. It was not resurrected.

Hey! ho! for the Victorian Extravaganza.

Artie.


EARLIEST APPOINTMENT USING YOUR FREE WEST BERKS BUS PASS
ROYAL BERKSHIRE Hospital = 12 o’clock

and your journey will involve 3 buses and nearly 3 hours

Hungerford to Royal Berks Hospital Reading

Catch the number 13 bus at Hungerford High Street outside Marc Allen
Catch the number 222 & 95 bus at Hungerford outside Town Hall.

At Newbury get off at Newbury Bus Station to get the number 1 bus to Reading. If you are on the 95 on a Thursday, get of at Camps and cross the road to Superdrug.

At Reading get off at Reading Railway Station for number 9,22,62,144 buses, for the Royal Berks.
The stops at the station have the letters SK for Nos. 9 & 144 , SC is for No 62, and SJ is for no 22

Bus no
Hungerford depart
Newbury arrive
 
Bus no
Newbury depart
Reading arrive
 
Bus no
Reading depart
Royal Berks
13
9.20
10.08
 
1
10.10
11.22
 
9
every 10/15 mins
222 Th
9.40
10.10
 
1
10.40
11.52
 
22
every 30 mins
95 Th
11.00
11.20
 
1
11.10
12.22
 
62
Hourly
 
13
11.20
12.08
 
 
runs
 
 
144
Hourly
 
13
13.20
14.08
 
 
every
 
 
 
 
 
13
16.30
17.18
 
 
30 mins
 
 
 
 
 
13
18.20
18.58
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

     COMING BACK    
Bus no
Royal Berks depart
Reading arrive
 
Bus no
Reading depart
Newbury arrive
 
Bus no
Newbury depart
Hungerford arrive
9
every 10/15 mins
 
1
12.05
13.20
 
 
 
 
22
every 30 mins
 
1
12.35
13.50
 
 
 
 
62
Hourly
 
 
1
13.05
14.20
 
95 Th
13.40
14.00
144
Hourly
 
 
1
13.35
14.50
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
14.05
15.20
 
13
15.30
16.28
Leave Royal Berks Latest
Runs every 30 mins
 
Below is the last bus
 
14.30
 
 
1
16.05
17.20
 
13
17.30
18.18
           

Catch the number 9 ,22 ,62 & 144 bus at the Hospital go to Reading Railway Station for the number 1 bus to Newbury.
At Newbury get off at the Bus Station for number 13 or 222 for the Hungerford bus.
For the no. 95 get off at Camps and cross the road to Superdrug.


Bus passes can also be used at the weekends, times may vary slightly.
Please contact Paul for further help.


FREE BUS PASS,CATCH THE No.46 BUS for RAMSBURY OUTSIDE Rayners

Bus no
Hungerford
Ramsbury
 
Ramsbury
Hungerford
Bus no
46
10.36
10.48
 
12.17
12.29
46
RCB(W&F)
12.00
12.19
 
 
 
 
46
12.36
12.48
 
14.20
14.32
46
46
15.22
15.35
 
16.22
16.34
46
46
16.43
16.55
 
18.32
18.49
46


FREE BUS PASS, CATCH THE BUS nos 90 or 95 for LAMBOURN OUTSIDE
The Town Hall
Try not to travel this route on a Thursday!

Bus no
Hungerford
Lambourn
 
Lambourn
Hungerford
Bus no
90
10.00
10.17
 
11.20 not Th
11.37
90
90 not Th
10.45
11.02
 
12.20 not Th
12.37
90
90 not Th
11.45
12.02
 
13.20 not Th
13.37
90
90 not Th
12.45
13.02
 
14.50
15.07
90
90 not Th
14.10
14.27
 
16.00
16.17
90
95 Th
14.00
14.30
 
17.20
17.37
90

 

FREE BUS PASS, CATCH THE NOS 95 /96 for PEWSEY in MARLBOROUGH OUTSIDE Lloyds Bank  See the first page for bus times to Marlborough.

Bus no
Marlborough
Pewsey
 
Pewsey
Marlborough
Bus no
 
Bus no
To Hungerford
95 / 96
11.12
11.29
 
11.33
11.52
95 / 96
 
20A
12.15
every hour until
 
 
every hour until
 
 
20A
14.14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20
15.35
       
 
20
16.20
95 / 96
15.12
15.29
 
16.33
16.52
95 / 96
 
20A
17.00

Catch the Hungerford bus outside Lloyds Bank to come home.


Blasts from the Past

rom the Parish Magazine for February 1875.


“ On Wednesday, January 13, a very handsome Testimonial was presented to the Rev. J.E. Binney on his leaving Hungerford for Summertown Vicarage, Oxford. It consisted of a silver parcel-gilt Claret Jug, of very beautiful design and workmanship, together with a Candlestick and Egg-boiler. The following inscription is engraved of the Claret Jug: “Presented to the Reverend John Erskine Binney on his leaving Hungerford, by several Parishioners of Hungerford, Denford, and Newtown, grateful for his services among them. January 1875.” Mr Binney has also received farewell gifts of six silver Salt-cellars and Spoons from the members of the Working Men’s Hall; of a silver Pencil case and Penholder from the girls of the National School; and of a Silver-gilt Baptismal Shell and Prayer Book from the Eddington Sunday School.”

From the Parish Magazine for February 1881.

“The Frost which has prevailed during the greater part of last month, has been of unusual severity. Mr H Woodham has kindly furnished the following memorandum of the degrees of cold (degrees Fahrenheit) registered by his thermometer on each day of the frost.

12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th
18    15      9      4       6     5       22    23    7      8     10      20     5      19    15

On Tuesday and Wednesday the 18th and 19th, there was a very heavy fall of snow, which rendered the roads impassable and blocked the railway for two days. Many deplorable accidents have occurred in different parts of the country and in this neighbourhood, but among our own people, though there have been many hair-breadth escapes, we thank God that no lives have been lost. Among the minor inconveniences of the snow may be mentioned the postponement of our Loan Exhibition of Pictures, etc. which we hoped would have been an agreeable and effectual way of raising funds to defray the debt on our Parish Church. The snow made it absolutely impossible to convey the Pictures and other works of Art and objects of interest which were promised from Denford, Chilton Lodge, Welford Park, Wickham Rectory, Bagshot, Littlecott, Hungerford Park, Wormstall, Woolley Park, Kintbury Vicarage and elsewhere, and it was thought better to defer the Exhibition to the first week of May.”

Footnote: For the uneducated like myself who have forgotten the use of degrees of Fahrenheit and are more used to Centigrade, the equivalent of 4 degrees Fahrenheit is approximately minus 16 degrees Centigrade, so it was really very cold. In spite of this being before the days of Central Heating, Secondary double glazing and the like, the residents of the Town obviously coped well with the cold, as the Parish Registers do not evidence any increase in the death rate and in fact there were only 4 burials recorded for the month of January and only 2 for February of that year.

More from the Archives next quarter.                              Fred Bailey

 

 

12th13th14th15th16th17th18th19th20th21st22nd23rd24th25th26th 
18159465222378102051915Fahr.
-8
-18
-13
-16
-14
-15
-6
-5
-14
-13
-12
-7
-15
-8
-9
Cent

So the warmest figure of -5 is 25degrees lower than your central heating is probably set!

 

Back to Top

Church Bells

Bell ringing at St Lawrence Church – Part 7

As promised in the January edition, I thought you would be interested to hear how our “Newbury Branch Quarter Peal Week” went. Well, firstly, it was a resounding success and, in the branch as a whole, we rang 25 quarter peals between Sunday 15th and Saturday 21st of February. Sixty five of our local ringers took part, many achieving “firsts” which was one of the aims of the week. There are 21 towers in the Newbury Branch with 4 or more “ringable” bells and we managed to ring at all bar 2. Here is a full list:

Beenham, St Mary, 1260 Plain Bob & Grandsire Doubles
Newbury, St Nicolas, 1260 Grandsire
Hungerford, St Lawrence, 1260 Grandsire Doubles
Midgham, St Matthew, 1260 Plain Bob Minor
Newbury, St Nicolas, 1296 Grandsire Caters
Chaddleworth, St Andrew, 1272 Plain Bob Minimus
Stanford Dingley, St Denys. 1272 Mixed Minimus
East Ilsley, St Mary. 1280 Double Norwich Court Bob Major
Yattendon, SS Peter & Paul. 1260 Grandsire Doubles
Shaw, St Mary. 1440 London Surprise Minor
Speen, St Mary, 1260 Plain Bob Doubles
East Garston, All Saints. 1260 of Grandsire & Plain Bob
Brightwalton, All Saints. 1260 Doubles.
Bucklebury, St Mary. 1250 Lincolnshire Surprise Major
Lambourn, St Michael & All Angels. 1260 Stedman Triples
Aldermaston, St Mary the Virgin. 1260 Grandsire Doubles.
Bucklebury, St Mary, 1260 Plain Bob Doubles.
Thatcham, St Mary. 1260 Plain Bob Royal
Hungerford, St Lawrence. 1260 Grandsire Triples
Compton Parva, SS Mary & Nicholas. 1260 Grandsire Doubles.
Beedon, St Nicholas. 1260 April Day Doubles.
Hampstead Norreys, St Mary. 1259 Grandsire Doubles
Aldermaston, St Mary the Virgin, 1320 Plain Bob Doubles
Aldermaston, St Mary the Virgin, 1250 Cambridge Major
Bucklebury, St Mary. 1260 Grandsire Doubles

Mark Robbins